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J Cancer Educ. 2003 Summer;18(2):73-7.

Increasing ethnic diversity in cancer control research: description and impact of a model training program.

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-0981, USA. rpasick@cc.ucsf.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is little ethnic diversity at the doctoral level among researchers in cancer control. The Minority Training Program in Cancer Control Research is designed to encourage underrepresented master's level health science students to pursue doctoral training and careers in research.

METHODS:

Program components include an annual 5-day summer institute, internships, and doctoral incentive awards. Intention to pursue doctoral training is measured before and after participation. Doctoral applications and enrollment are tracked through annual surveys.

RESULTS:

Seventy students participated during the first three years, 1999-2001. Intention to apply increased significantly for each class (year one, p %lt; 0.001; year two, p = 0.042; year three, p = 0.006). Thirty-one percent of participants have either enrolled in doctoral programs (n= 10) or report plans to apply in the next one to two years (n = 9). Over half of these students indicated that the MTPCCR had a positive influence on their plans.

CONCLUSIONS:

A targeted training program encourages under-represented students to pursue doctoral degrees and thus has the potential to increase ethnic diversity in public health research.

PMID:
12888379
PMCID:
PMC3800740
DOI:
10.1207/S15430154JCE1802_07
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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