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Afr J Med Med Sci. 1992 Oct;21(1):33-9.

A prospective study on some factors which influence the delivery of low birth weight babies in a developing country.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

Abstract

The study was prospective in design and carried out in Ibadan, Nigeria. It was undertaken in order to provide more information on the low birth weight deliveries seen here and to evaluate some factors associated with their births. 600 randomly selected gravid women who presented to the antenatal booking clinics for the first time in this pregnancy were followed up till delivery of their babies. Data on 492 women who produced normal, singleton babies were analysed. The mean birth weight was 3167g +/- 451g (males; 3205g +/- 469g and significantly higher than of females of 2991g +/- 468g). The incidence of low birth weight (LBW) weight of 2500g and less was 8.3% and comprised of 18 males, 22 females and 1 unknown sex. 80% of these LBW babies were term (37-41 wks gestation) at delivery, while 20% were pre-term (< 37 wks). There was seasonal variation in the incidence of LBW, the risk being highest during the peak of dry season and lowest during the rainy season. The mothers age, parity, height, ponderal index at delivery, and total maternal weight gain as well as birth interval were each significantly related to the incidence of LBW in these mothers (P < 0.01). Maternal education as well as socio-economic class were not significant (P > 0.5).

PIP:

The study was prospective in design and carried out in Ibadan, Nigeria. It was undertaken in order to provide more information on the low birth weight (LBW) deliveries seen here and to evaluate some factors associated with these births. 600 randomly selected gravid women who presented to the antenatal booking clinics for the first time in their pregnancy were followed up till delivery of their babies. Data on 492 women who produced normal, singleton births were analyzed. The mean birth weight was 3167 g +or- 451 g (males: 3205 g +or- 469 g; females: 2991 g +or- 468 g). The incidence of low birth weight of 2500 g and less was 8.3% and consisted of 18 males, 22 females, and 1 unknown sex. 80% of these LBW babies were term (37-41 weeks gestation) at delivery, while 20% were preterm (37 weeks). There was seasonal variation in the incidence of LBW, the risk being highest during the peak of the dry season and lowest during the rainy season. Mother's age, parity, height, ponderal index at delivery, and total maternal weight gain, as well as birth interval, were each significantly related to the incidence of LBW in these mothers (p 0.01). Maternal education, as well as socioeconomic class, were not significant (p 0.5).

PMID:
1288241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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