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Burns. 2003 Aug;29(5):469-72.

Work-related burn injuries in Ontario, Canada: has anything changed in the last 10 years?

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1
Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ont., Canada M4N 3M5.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many burn injuries occur in the workplace. Previous research from this institution 10 years ago analyzed the incidence and nature of occupation-related burns admitted to our facility.

PURPOSE:

To compare the current incidence and patterns of work-related burn injuries treated at our adult regional burn center (Current group) with the findings of a similar study 10 years ago (Early group).

METHODS:

Retrospective study of all burn center admissions between 5 December 1998 and 31 December 2000 was completed. The data from the Early and Current groups was analyzed using the Chi-square test of homogeneity.

RESULTS:

During the study period, 355 patients were hospitalized. After exclusions, 100 occupational burn cases were identified (28%). The mean age of patients was 39+/-12 years, 90% were male. The mean total body surface area (TBSA) burn was 11+/-13.7%. The most common mechanism of burn was electrical (32%), followed by flame (22%), scald (17%), tar (14%), contact (8%), and chemical (7%). Four patients (4%) died of their injuries. There were no significant differences between the Current group and the Early group in terms of incidence, age, gender, occupation, mechanism of burn, or mortality.

CONCLUSION:

In the past 10 years no change was found in the incidence or pattern of work-related burn injuries treated at this institution. This suggests that existing prevention strategies have not been effective.

PMID:
12880727
DOI:
10.1016/s0305-4179(03)00063-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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