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Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2003 Aug;4(8):1259-75.

Treatment of bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

Author information

1
College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Weaver-Densford Hall 7-115C, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. guayx001@umn.edu

Abstract

Bacterial skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) are among the most frequently seen infectious entities in the community setting and occasionally in the institutional setting. A wide variety of SSSIs exist, with cellulitis, impetigo and folliculitis being the most common. Most SSSIs are caused by aerobic staphylococci and streptococci, with aerobic Gram-negative bacilli and anaerobes being involved in more complicated infections. Systemic therapy with a variety of beta-lactams, macrolides and lincosamides (clindamycin) have been the cornerstone of SSSI therapy for many years. With the exception of mupirocin, topical therapy occupies a small therapeutic niche. Despite the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among the pathogens most commonly associated with SSSIs (for example, Streptococcus pyogenes and macrolides; Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin, vancomycin, penicillin and mupirocin), few treatment failures have been reported. The newest antimicrobials reviewed herein (linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, gatifloxacin, gemifloxacin and moxifloxacin) are not a significant improvement upon older agents in the treatment of SSSIs. Perhaps this assessment will change if the penetrance of the antimicrobial resistance patterns described above reach a critical threshold and clinical failures become more widespread.

PMID:
12877635
DOI:
10.1517/14656566.4.8.1259
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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