Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Chemosphere. 2003 Sep;52(9):1353-9.

A global health problem caused by arsenic from natural sources.

Author information

1
National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, The University of Queensland, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plains, Brisbane, Queensland 4108, Australia. j.ng@mailbox.uq.edu.au

Abstract

Arsenic is a carcinogen to both humans and animals. Arsenicals have been associated with cancers of the skin, lung, and bladder. Clinical manifestations of chronic arsenic poisoning include non-cancer end point of hyper- and hypo-pigmentation, keratosis, hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Epidemiological evidence indicates that arsenic concentration exceeding 50 microg l(-1) in the drinking water is not public health protective. The current WHO recommended guideline value for arsenic in drinking water is 10 microg l(-1), whereas many developing countries are still having a value of 50 microg l(-1). It has been estimated that tens of millions of people are at risk exposing to excessive levels of arsenic from both contaminated water and arsenic-bearing coal from natural sources. The global health implication and possible intervention strategies were also discussed in this review article.

PMID:
12867164
DOI:
10.1016/S0045-6535(03)00470-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center