Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Med J Aust. 2003 Jul 21;179(2):75-9.

Factors associated with rural practice among Australian-trained general practitioners.

Author information

1
Department of General Practice, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the factors associated with general practitioners' current practice location, with particular emphasis on rural location.

DESIGN:

Observational, retrospective, case-control study using a self-administered questionnaire.

SETTING:

Australian general practices in December 2000.

PARTICIPANTS:

2414 Australian-trained rural and urban GPs.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Current urban or rural practice location.

RESULTS:

For Australia as a whole, rural GPs were more likely to be male (odds ratio [OR], 1.42; 95% CI, 1.17-1.73), Australian-born (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.55-2.45), and to report attending a rural primary school for "some" (OR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.69-2.89) or "all" (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.94-4.00) of their primary schooling. Rural GPs' partners or spouses were also more likely to report "some" (OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 2.07-3.66) or "all" (OR, 2.86; 95% CI, 2.02-4.05) rural primary schooling. A rural background in both GP and partner produced the highest likelihood of rural practice (OR, 6.28; 95% CI, 4.26-9.25). For individual jurisdictions, a trend towards more rural GPs being men was only significant in Tasmania. In all jurisdictions except Tasmania and the Northern Territory, rural GPs were more likely to be Australian-born.

CONCLUSIONS:

GPs' and their partners' rural background (residence and primary and secondary schooling) influences choice of practice location, with partners' background appearing to exert more influence.

PMID:
12864716
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center