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J Pathol. 2003 Jul;200(4):500-3.

The myofibroblast in wound healing and fibrocontractive diseases.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, CMU University of Geneva, 1 rue Michel-Servet, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland. giulio.gabbiani@medicine.unige.ch

Abstract

The demonstration that fibroblastic cells acquire contractile features during the healing of an open wound, thus modulating into myofibroblasts, has open a new perspective in the understanding of mechanisms leading to wound closure and fibrocontractive diseases. Myofibroblasts synthesize extracellular matrix components such as collagen types I and III and during normal wound healing disappear by apoptosis when epithelialization occurs. The transition from fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is influenced by mechanical stress, TGF-beta and cellular fibronectin (ED-A splice variant). These factors also play important roles in the development of fibrocontractive changes, such as those observed in liver cirrhosis, renal fibrosis, and stroma reaction to epithelial tumours.

PMID:
12845617
DOI:
10.1002/path.1427
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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