Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Phys Ther. 2003 Jul;83(7):608-16.

Manipulation of the wrist for management of lateral epicondylitis: a randomized pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Research Center Amsterdam, Academic Medical Center, Meibergdreef 9, PO Box 22600, 1100 DD Amsterdam, The Netherlands. paastruijs@hotmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Lateral epicondylitis ("tennis elbow") is a common entity. Several nonoperative interventions, with varying success rates, have been described. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 2 protocols for the management of lateral epicondylitis: (1) manipulation of the wrist and (2) ultrasound, friction massage, and muscle stretching and strengthening exercises.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

Thirty-one subjects with a history and examination results consistent with lateral epicondylitis participated in the study. The subjects were randomly assigned to either a group that received manipulation of the wrist (group 1) or a group that received ultrasound, friction massage, and muscle stretching and strengthening exercises (group 2). Three subjects were lost to follow-up, leaving 28 subjects for analysis. Follow-up was at 3 and 6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was a global measure of improvement, as assessed on a 6-point scale. Analysis was performed using independent t tests, Mann-Whitney U tests, and Fisher exact tests.

RESULTS:

Differences were found for 2 outcome measures: success rate at 3 weeks and decrease in pain at 6 weeks. Both findings indicated manipulation was more effective than the other protocol. After 3 weeks of intervention, the success rate in group 1 was 62%, as compared with 20% in group 2. After 6 weeks of intervention, improvement in pain as measured on an 11-point numeric scale was 5.2 (SD=2.4) in group 1, as compared with 3.2 (SD=2.1) in group 2.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

Manipulation of the wrist appeared to be more effective than ultrasound, friction massage, and muscle stretching and strengthening exercises for the management of lateral epicondylitis when there was a short-term follow-up. However, replication of our results is needed in a large-scale randomized clinical trial with a control group and a longer-term follow-up.

PMID:
12837122
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center