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EMBO Rep. 2003 Jul;4(7):671-7.

Regulating mammalian checkpoints through Cdc25 inactivation.

Author information

1
European Institute of Oncology, 435 Via Ripamonti, 20141 Milan, Italy.

Abstract

Precise monitoring of DNA replication and chromosome segregation ensures that there is accurate transmission of genetic information from a cell to its daughters. Eukaryotic cells have developed a complex network of checkpoint pathways that sense DNA lesions and defects in chromosome segregation, spindle assembly and the centrosome cycle, leading to an inhibition of cell-cycle progression for the time required to remove the defect and thus preventing genomic instability. The activation of checkpoints that are responsive to DNA damage or incomplete DNA replication ultimately results in the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. This review focuses on our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms that specifically inactivate Cdc25 (cell division cycle 25) phosphatases to achieve this. The evidence for links between checkpoint deregulation and oncogenesis is discussed.

PMID:
12835754
PMCID:
PMC1326326
DOI:
10.1038/sj.embor.embor887
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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