Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Diabetes Care. 2003 Jul;26(7):2094-9.

Association between insulin sensitivity and post-glucose challenge plasma insulin values in overweight Latino youth.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine associations between directly measured insulin sensitivity (SI) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived plasma insulin values, or calculated SI indices, in overweight peripubertal Latino children at risk for type 2 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

Thirty overweight Latino children with a family history of type 2 diabetes, aged 8-13 years, Tanner stages 1-2, underwent an OGTT. Fasting and 2-h plasma insulin values and OGTT-derived SI indices were compared with SI derived from a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIGTT) with minimal model analysis, before and after adjustment for total body fat and lean tissue mass, or BMI.

RESULTS:

FSIGTT-derived SI for all subjects was 1.62 +/- 0.78 x 10(-4) min (-1) x (microU/ml), with no sex differences. SI correlated (all P values < 0.001) with fasting (r = -0.57) and 2-h (r = -0.58) plasma insulin and all SI indices (r = -0.57 to 0.67). After adjusting for total body fat and lean tissue mass, or BMI, the associations between SI and either fasting insulin or fasting SI indices were no longer significant. However, the 2-h insulin and post-glucose challenge SI indices maintained significant independent associations with SI, even after adjustment for body composition.

CONCLUSIONS:

In overweight, peripubertal Latino children at risk for type 2 diabetes, the 2-h plasma insulin value and postchallenge SI indices are better independent correlates of SI than fasting values, after accounting for body composition. The 2-h insulin may therefore be superior to fasting insulin as a single blood sample value for clinical or epidemiological estimates of SI, especially when combined with assessment of body composition.

PMID:
12832319
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center