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Gynecol Oncol. 2003 Jul;90(1):150-7.

The effect of body mass index on clinical/pathologic features, surgical morbidity, and outcome in patients with endometrial cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195-6460, USA. everett@u.washinton.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on clinical/pathologic features, surgical morbidity, and outcome in patients with endometrial cancer.

METHODS:

All women with surgically treated endometrial cancer at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, between 1 January 1990 and 1 January 2000 were eligible; 439 patients were identified and 43 were excluded due to incomplete medical records; 396 patients underwent retrospective chart review. Statistical analysis was performed by SPSS. Median follow-up time was 27 months (range, 1 to 120 mo).

RESULTS:

Mean BMI was 34 (range, 15 to 69). BMI was <30 in 40.7% of patients, 30 to 40 in 32.3%, and >40 in 27.0%. Clinically, patients with a BMI of >40 were more likely to have hypertension, diabetes, and pulmonary disease. Those patients with a BMI of >40 had statistically longer operating times (209 vs. 159 min) and more blood loss (604 vs. 324 ml) than patients with a BMI of <30. However, there was no difference between the three groups in number of lymph nodes removed, units of blood transfused, length of hospital stay, number of intensive care unit (ICU) days, or intraoperative complications. Postoperatively, patients with a BMI of >40 were more likely to have a wound separation than thinner patients. Pathologically, patients with a BMI of >40 were more likely to have endometrioid histology, lower stage disease, and lower grade tumors than women with a BMI of <30. However, 11.3% of patients with lymph node sampling and a BMI of >40 had positive lymph nodes and 23% were stage II or higher. Forty-two patients (10.6%) recurred. There were no postoperative deaths, and there was no difference in survival between the three groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with a BMI of >40 frequently have favorable stage I endometrial cancers. However, approximately a quarter of these patients have evidence of cervical or extrauterine disease. This study confirms that surgical staging can be performed adequately and safely in morbidly obese patients with no difference in length of hospital stay, number of ICU days, intraoperative or postoperative complications.

PMID:
12821356
DOI:
10.1016/s0090-8258(03)00232-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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