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Colorectal Dis. 2003 Jul;5(4):288-96.

Chronic idiopathic slow transit constipation: pathophysiology and management.

Author information

1
Section for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, University Hospital, UmeƄ, Sweden. magdy.el-salhy@medicin.umu.se

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Patients with idiopathic slow-transit constipation comprise a small proportion of the total population complaining of constipation. The purpose of this review is to present an update of pathophysiology of this disorder and its application in clinical management.

METHODS:

Medline was used to search English language articles published up to the end of September 2002 on the subject of slow-transit constipation.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with idiopathic slow-transit constipation can be divided into 2 subgroups: 1. patients with normal proximal gastrointestinal motility and with onset of constipation in connection with childbirth or pelvic surgery. This subgroup may benefit from consideration of surgical treatment; 2. patients who have a dysfunctional enteric nervous/neuroendocrine system and exhibit colonic dysmotility as part of a generalised gastrointestinal dysmotility. Surgical approach in this subgroup seems to be unhelpful and medical treatment appears to be a better approach.

PMID:
12814404
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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