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Am J Gastroenterol. 2003 May;98(5):1052-7.

Colonic manometry in children with defecatory disorders. role in diagnosis and management.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of colonic manometry in clarifying pathophysiology of childhood defecatory disorders and to evaluate its impact on management.

METHODS:

We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of children referred to undergo colonic manometry to a tertiary care Motility Center from 1996 to 2001. Families were followed up a median of 20 months after evaluation (range 3-60 months).

RESULTS:

A total of 150 colonic manometries were performed in 146 children (74 male, median age 79 months, range 4-225 months). Colonic manometry had been requested to clarify the pathophysiology of lower GI symptoms in 68%; as part of diagnostic workup for chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in 11%; to decide about reanastomosis of a diverted colon in 7%; and to clarify the pathophysiology of persisting symptoms after surgery for Hirschsprung's disease in 14%. Normal motility was found in the entire colon in 38% of children. In 17%, there was normal motility in the proximal colon with abnormality limited to the dilated distal colon. Abnormal motility was found in 45% of children. After colonic manometry, treatment changes were recommended in 93% of patients. We were able to follow up 65% of the families. When recommendations were followed (96% of the contacted patients), the symptoms improved in 78%, were unchanged in 18%, and were worse in 4% of patients. Among the parents, 88% believed that the suggestions given after colonic manometry had been helpful in improving their children's health.

CONCLUSIONS:

Colonic manometry may provide information useful in guiding therapy in a subgroup of patients with defecatory disorders.

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