Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Fertil Steril. 2003 Jun;79 Suppl 3:1597-605.

Negative effects of increased sperm DNA damage in relation to seminal oxidative stress in men with idiopathic and male factor infertility.

Author information

1
Center for Advanced Research in Human Reproduction, Infertility, and Sexual Function, Urological Institute, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the effects of increased sperm DNA damage in relation to seminal oxidative stress in men with idiopathic and male factor infertility. Prospective study.

SETTINGS:

Infertility clinic at a tertiary care academic institution.

PATIENT(S):

Ninety-two infertile men with normal female partners. Sixteen fertile donors served as the control group.

INTERVENTION(S):

Standard semen analysis and assessment of levels of seminal oxidative stress. Assisted reproductive techniques in 33 of the 92 patients (IUI [n = 19], IVF [n = 10], and intracytoplasmic sperm injection [n = 4]).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Sperm DNA damage by sperm chromatin structure assay. Results were expressed as DNA fragmentation index.

RESULT(S):

Patients were classified as having either idiopathic (n = 23) or male factor infertility (n = 69). Patients with idiopathic and male factor infertility had significantly higher DNA fragmentation index and oxidative stress compared with the case of fertile donors. A clinical pregnancy was achieved in 9 (27%) of 33 patients with assisted reproductive techniques. Significantly higher DNA fragmentation index and oxidative stress were found in men who failed to initiate a pregnancy after assisted reproductive techniques (n = 24), compared with the cases of those who succeeded and of the fertile donors. DNA fragmentation index was correlated positively with oxidative stress (r = 0.27), and negatively with fertilization (r = -0.70) and embryo quality (r = -0.70).

CONCLUSION(S):

Sperm DNA damage is significantly increased in men with idiopathic and male factor infertility and in men who failed to initiate a pregnancy after assisted reproductive techniques. Such an increase may be related to high levels of seminal oxidative stress.

PMID:
12801566
DOI:
10.1016/s0015-0282(03)00337-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center