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Psychol Bull. 2003 May;129(3):414-46.

A justification-suppression model of the expression and experience of prejudice.

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1
Department of Psychology, University of Kansas, 1415 Jay-hawk Boulevard, Lawrence, Kansas 66045, USA. crandall@ku.edu

Abstract

The authors propose a justification-suppression model (JSM), which characterizes the processes that lead to prejudice expression and the experience of one's own prejudice. They suggest that "genuine" prejudices are not directly expressed but are restrained by beliefs, values, and norms that suppress them. Prejudices are expressed when justifications (e.g., attributions, ideologies, stereotypes) release suppressed prejudices. The same process accounts for which prejudices are accepted into the self-concept The JSM is used to organize the prejudice literature, and many empirical findings are recharacterized as factors affecting suppression or justification, rather than directly affecting genuine prejudice. The authors discuss the implications of the JSM for several topics, including prejudice measurement, ambivalence, and the distinction between prejudice and its expression.

PMID:
12784937
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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