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Exp Brain Res. 2003 Jul;151(2):262-71. Epub 2003 Jun 3.

Experimental muscle pain changes feedforward postural responses of the trunk muscles.

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. p.hodges@shrs.uq.edu.au

Abstract

Many studies have identified changes in trunk muscle recruitment in clinical low back pain (LBP). However, due to the heterogeneity of the LBP population these changes have been variable and it has been impossible to identify a cause-effect relationship. Several studies have identified a consistent change in the feedforward postural response of transversus abdominis (TrA), the deepest abdominal muscle, in association with arm movements in chronic LBP. This study aimed to determine whether the feedforward recruitment of the trunk muscles in a postural task could be altered by acute experimentally induced LBP. Electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the abdominal and paraspinal muscles were made during arm movements in a control trial, following the injection of isotonic (non-painful) and hypertonic (painful) saline into the longissimus muscle at L4, and during a 1-h follow-up. Movements included rapid arm flexion in response to a light and repetitive arm flexion-extension. Temporal and spatial EMG parameters were measured. The onset and amplitude of EMG of most muscles was changed in a variable manner during the period of experimentally induced pain. However, across movement trials and subjects the activation of TrA was consistently reduced in amplitude or delayed. Analyses in the time and frequency domain were used to confirm these findings. The results suggest that acute experimentally induced pain may affect feedforward postural activity of the trunk muscles. Although the response was variable, pain produced differential changes in the motor control of the trunk muscles, with consistent impairment of TrA activity.

PMID:
12783146
DOI:
10.1007/s00221-003-1457-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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