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Sex Transm Dis. 2003 Jun;30(6):512-5.

Comparison of STD burden and risk among men with and without regular doctors attending a southern urban STD clinic.

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1
Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 703 19th Street South, 242 Ziegler Research Building, Birmingham, AL 35294-0007, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies addressing health-seeking behaviors among men at risk for STD are few; this study examines how having a regular doctor might influence risk-taking or STD prevalence.

GOAL:

The goal was to examine demographic, sexual, and health-seeking characteristics of male STD clinic attendees.

STUDY DESIGN:

Randomly selected men attending an STD clinic answered a questionnaire regarding the aforementioned characteristics. The men were stratified according to whether they reported having a regular doctor.

RESULTS:

Of 467 men, 32% reported a regular doctor. These men were more likely to be older, to be better educated, and to state they would seek care for a medical problem at a doctor's office. The two groups did not differ in STD history or prostitute exposure; men without doctors were more likely to have urethritis and STD, although the men with doctors had substantial STD rates.

CONCLUSION:

Public health clinics remain an important safety net for the management of STD, even for men who report a regular doctor.

PMID:
12782953
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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