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J Pediatr Surg. 2003 Jun;38(6):984-7.

Fetal tracheal augmentation with cartilage engineered from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells.

Author information

1
Harvard Center for Minimally Invasive Surgery, Center for the Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technologies, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE:

The authors have described previously the use of engineered fetal cartilage in a large animal model of fetal tracheal repair. This study was aimed at comparing cartilage engineered from bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSC) to native and engineered cartilage, in this model.

METHODS:

Ovine BMSC were expanded in vitro, seeded onto biodegradable scaffolds, and maintained in transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1)-supplemented medium for 3 months (group I). Identical scaffolds were seeded with fetal chondrocytes (group II). All constructs were analyzed in vitro, implanted into fetal tracheas, and harvested after birth for further analysis.

RESULTS:

There were no differences in survival between the groups. All BMSC-based constructs exhibited chondrogenic differentiation. Matrix analyses in vitro showed that both groups had similar levels of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and type II collagen (C-II), but lower levels of elastin when compared with native fetal cartilage. Yet, compared with group II, group I had higher levels of GAG, equal levels of C-II, and lower levels of elastin. However, remodeling resulted in no differences between the 2 groups in any of these variables in vivo.

CONCLUSIONS:

The bone marrow may be a useful cell source for cartilage engineering aimed at the surgical repair of severe congenital tracheal anomalies, such as tracheal atresia and agenesis, in utero.

PMID:
12778408
DOI:
10.1016/s0022-3468(03)00139-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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