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Percept Mot Skills. 2003 Apr;96(2):414-20.

Use of self-reports of physical fitness as substitutes for performance-based measures of physical fitness in older adults.

Author information

1
Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, University of West Florida, Pensacola 32514, USA. pschuler@uwf.edu

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the association between self-reported physical fitness and performance-based measures of physical fitness in older adults. The specific components of physical fitness evaluated included aerobic endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility. Adults (25 men and 47 women) ranging in age from 56 to 92 years (M age=75 yr.) were recruited from the local community. Generally, the associations between self-reported and performance-based measures of physical fitness were low to moderate (r = 30-.01). Based on these findings, self-reports of physical fitness should not be used as substitutes for performance-based measures of physical fitness in older adults. Furthermore, present findings suggest that older adults, when asked to rate subcomponents of physical fitness, may not do so but rather evaluate a more general concept of physical fitness with aerobic endurance as the dominant factor.

PMID:
12776822
DOI:
10.2466/pms.2003.96.2.414
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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