Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Intensive Care Med. 2003 Jul;29(7):1141-4. Epub 2003 May 28.

Randomised trial on the influence of continuous magnesium infusion on arrhythmias following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease.

Author information

1
Abteilung (Klinik III) Angeborene Herzfehler/Pädiatrische Kardiologie, Zentrum für Kinderheilkunde und Jugendmedizin, Mathildenstrasse 1, 79106, Freiburg, Germany. dittrich@kikli.ukl.uni-freiburg.de

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To check the hypothesis that continuous magnesium infusion protects the heart from arrhythmias following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease.

DESIGN:

A prospective randomised placebo-controlled study, with patients stratified in three weight groups.

PATIENTS AND PARTICIPANTS:

The study group ( n=65) postoperatively received a magnesium infusion (1 mmol/kg), the control group ( n=66) received placebo. In both groups serum and ionised magnesium values were followed, and all postoperative arrhythmias were documented for 24 h.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS:

Serum and ionised magnesium in the blood was elevated after the end of bypass (0.54+/-0.15 mmol l(-1) pre-operatively, 0.88+/-0.24 mmol l(-1) postoperatively), where a cardioplegia solution containing magnesium was used. Magnesium values remained at this elevated level in the magnesium therapy group, and decreased to normal pre-operative values within 24 h in controls ( P<0.001). The incidence of postoperative arrhythmias was lower in the study group: 8/65 in the study group and 17/66 in the control group, respectively (chi-squared test, P=0.05). Lower patient weight (32.7 kg versus 22.6 kg), longer cardiopulmonary bypass time (128.7 min versus 87.9 min) and deeper body temperature during extracorporeal circulation (29.2 degrees C versus 32.6 degrees C) were identified as risk factors for postoperative arrhythmias ( P<0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Continuous magnesium infusion effectively reduces the rate of arrhythmias following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery for congenital heart disease and should, therefore, be routinely used.

PMID:
12774159
DOI:
10.1007/s00134-003-1802-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center