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Prostate. 2003 Aug 1;56(3):212-9.

Recombinant prostate specific antigen inhibits angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

Author information

1
EntreMed Inc., 9640 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850, USA. annef@entremed.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is a kallikrein family member with serine protease activity commonly used as a diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. We recently described anti-angiogenic properties of PSA [Fortier et al.: JNCI 91:1635-1640].

METHODS:

Two forms of PSA were cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris: one, an intact PSA with an N-terminus of IVGGVS em leader; the second, an N-1 PSA variant. The recombinant proteins were tested for serine protease activity and for anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo.

RESULTS:

The rate of substrate hydrolysis by the intact recombinant PSA was similar to that of PSA isolated and purified from human seminal plasma. In contrast, the N-1 PSA variant lacked serine protease activity. In an endothelial cell migration assay, the concentration that resulted in 50% inhibition (IC(50)) was: 0.5 microM for native PSA, 0.5 microM for intact recombinant protein, and 0.1 microM for the N-1 variant PSA. Both the intact recombinant and the N-1 recombinant PSA inhibited angiogenesis in vivo.

CONCLUSIONS:

Purified recombinant PSA inhibits angiogenesis, proving the concept that PSA is an anti-angiogenic, and serine protease activity, as determined by synthetic substrate hydrolysis, is distinct from the anti-angiogenic properties of PSA.

PMID:
12772191
DOI:
10.1002/pros.10256
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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