Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Urol. 2003 Jun;169(6):2166-9.

Is there an optimal time for intracavernous prostaglandin E1 rehabilitation following nonnerve sparing radical prostatectomy? Results from a hemodynamic prospective study.

Author information

1
Clinica Urologica and the Istituto di Igiene, Dipartimento di Scienze Mediche, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, Italy.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Previous studies have shown that early intracavernous prostaglandin E1 injection may reduce significantly the incidence of veno-occlusive dysfunction before spontaneous erections recover after nerve sparing radical prostatectomy. We identify the more convenient postoperative timing for successful intracavernous injection rehabilitation in a series of patients who underwent nonnerve sparing radical prostatectomy.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A total of 73 patients with a normal preoperative International Index of Erectile Function score were randomly allocated to undergo dynamic color Doppler ultrasound study 20 mg. prostaglandin E1 at 1, 2 to 3, 4 to 6 and 7 to 12 months postoperatively, respectively. In all cases the peak systolic velocity, end diastolic velocity and resistance index were evaluated at 5, 10 and 20 minutes after injection.

RESULTS:

Of the patients 36 received the intracavernous injection within the first 3 months (group 1) and 37 received it at 4 to 12 months (group 2). A significantly higher proportion of group 1 patients had grade 3 erection compared with group 2. Peak systolic velocity less than 30 cm. per second in at least 1 cavernosal artery was recorded in 22.2% of group 1 patients and 51.3% of group 2 (p >0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Intracavernous injections after nonnerve sparing radical prostatectomy produce valid erectile responses in a significantly higher proportion of patients when started within month 3 after the operation. Injection given in postoperative month 1 gives the best response rate but with significant complications and poor patient compliance. Arteriogenic and venogenic factors seem to be involved with failure.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center