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Infect Immun. 2003 Jun;71(6):3648-51.

Chemokine receptor CCR2 is not essential for the development of experimental cerebral malaria.

Author information

1
Département d'Immunologie, Institut Cochin, INSERM U567, CNRS UMR 8104, Université René Descartes, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France.

Abstract

Infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA induces cerebral malaria in susceptible mice. Brain-sequestered CD8(+) T cells are responsible for this pathology. We have evaluated the role of CCR2, a chemokine receptor expressed on CD8(+) T cells. Infected CCR2-deficient mice were as susceptible to cerebral malaria as wild-type mice were, and CD8(+) T-cell migration to the brain was not abolished.

PMID:
12761155
PMCID:
PMC155705
DOI:
10.1128/iai.71.6.3648-3651.2003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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