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World J Urol. 2003 May;21(1):31-6. Epub 2003 Feb 14.

Antiestrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators reduce prostate cancer risk.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, University of Tennessee, 1211 Union Avenue, Memphis, TN 38104, USA. msteiner@utmem.edu

Abstract

The development of chemoprevention strategies against prostate cancer would have the greatest overall impact both medically and economically against prostate cancer. Estrogens are required for prostate carcinogenesis. Estrogenic stimulation through estrogen receptor alpha in a milieu of decreasing androgens contributes significantly to the genesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate dysplasia, and prostate cancer. The ability of antiestrogens and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) to delay and to suppress prostate carcinogenesis is supported by preclinical, clinical, and epidemiological studies. SERMs have many features that make them attractive candidates for prostate cancer chemoprevention including their favorable safety profile and efficacy in preclinical prostate cancer models. The true clinical benefits of SERMs for chemoprevention to prevent prostate cancer, however, should continue to be investigated through human clinical trials. A phase IIb/III human clinical trial is currently evaluating safety and efficacy of toremifene, a SERM, in men who have high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia.

PMID:
12756492
DOI:
10.1007/s00345-002-0316-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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