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Arch Neurol. 2003 May;60(5):722-5.

A common NURR1 polymorphism associated with Parkinson disease and diffuse Lewy body disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

NURR1 plays a key role in mesencephalic dopaminergic neuron development and survival. A homozygous NURR1 polymorphism (a single base-pair insertion in intron 6) (NI6P) has been reported to be associated with Parkinson disease (PD).

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the association of the NI6P with PD and diffuse Lewy body disease.

DESIGN:

Case-control study.

SETTING:

Movement disorders clinic and tissue provided by brain banks.

PATIENTS:

Patients with pathologically proven PD (n = 37) or diffuse Lewy body disease (n = 35), neuropathologically normal control subjects (n = 59), those clinically diagnosed as having PD (n = 66), and spousal controls (n = 29).

METHODS:

Determining the frequency of heterozygotes and homozygotes for the NI6P by DNA sequencing and restriction endonuclease analyses.

RESULTS:

Overall, 41 (39.8%) of the 103 patients with PD were heterozygotes compared with 22 (25.0%) of the 88 controls (P =.03), with a relative risk (estimated from the odds ratio) for PD of 2.03 (95% confidence interval, 1.08-3.81) for heterozygotes vs wild type subjects. Heterozygotes were more frequent in the subgroup of patients with pathologically confirmed PD (18 [48.6%] of 37) vs controls (14 [23.7%] of 59) (P =.01), with a relative risk for PD of 2.84 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-6.88) for heterozygotes vs wild type subjects. In patients clinically diagnosed as having PD, heterozygotes were more frequent in early-onset cases (onset at < or =45 years) (10 [55.6%] of 18) compared with late-onset cases (onset at >45 years) (10 [23.8%] of 42) (P =.02) or spousal controls (8 [27.6%] of 29) (P =.06), with a relative risk for early-onset PD of 4.17 (95% confidence interval, 1.13-15.33) for heterozygotes vs subjects with 2 wild type alleles. The homozygous NI6P was not associated with PD, but was present in 6 (17.1%) of the 35 patients with diffuse Lewy body disease compared with 3 (5.1%) of the 59 controls (P =.06).

CONCLUSIONS:

The common heterozygous NI6P is associated with an increased risk of PD. An association of borderline significance was found for the homozygous NI6P and diffuse Lewy body disease.

PMID:
12756136
DOI:
10.1001/archneur.60.5.722
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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