Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Intern Med. 2003 May 20;138(10):795-806.

The cost-effectiveness of cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors in the management of chronic arthritis.

Author information

1
Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, CURE Digestive Diseases Research Center, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rofecoxib and celecoxib (coxibs) effectively treat chronic arthritis pain and reduce ulcer complications by 50% compared with nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, their absolute risk reduction is small and the cost-effectiveness of treatment is uncertain.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether the degree of risk reduction in gastrointestinal complications by coxibs offsets their increased cost compared with a generic nonselective NSAID.

DESIGN:

Cost-utility analysis.

DATA SOURCES:

Systematic review of MEDLINE and published abstracts.

TARGET POPULATION:

Patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis who are not taking aspirin and who require long-term NSAID therapy for moderate to severe arthritis pain.

PERSPECTIVE:

Third-party payer.

INTERVENTIONS:

Naproxen, 500 mg twice daily, and coxib, once daily. Patients intolerant of naproxen were switched to a coxib.

TIME HORIZON:

Lifetime.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained.

RESULTS OF BASE-CASE ANALYSIS:

Using a coxib instead of a nonselective NSAID in average-risk patients cost an incremental 275 809 dollars per year to gain 1 additional QALY.

RESULTS OF SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS:

The incremental cost per QALY gained decreased to 55 803 dollars when the analysis was limited to the subset of patients with a history of bleeding ulcers. The coxib strategy became dominant when the cost of coxibs was reduced by 90% of the current average wholesale price. In probabilistic sensitivity analysis, if a third-party payer was willing to pay 150 000 dollars per QALY gained, then 4.3% of average-risk patients would fall within the budget.

CONCLUSIONS:

The risk reduction seen with coxibs does not offset their increased costs compared with nonselective NSAIDs in the management of average-risk patients with chronic arthritis. However, coxibs may provide an acceptable incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in the subgroup of patients with a history of bleeding ulcers.

PMID:
12755551
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Support Center