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Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Apr;5(2):155-62.

Effect of smoking reduction on later cessation: a pilot experimental study.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont Burlington, VT, USA. carpenter@musc.edu

Abstract

It is unclear whether reducing the number of cigarettes in smokers not trying to quit increases or decreases the likelihood of future quitting. In a pilot study, smokers not currently interested in quitting (n=67) were randomized to two groups. Experimental participants received behavioral treatment and nicotine replacement therapy (choice of gum, patch, or inhaler) to reduce smoking by 50% over 4 weeks, followed by brief advice to quit. Usual-care participants received only brief advice to quit and nicotine replacement if they decided to quit. During the 4-week treatment period, nonabstaining reduction participants decreased from 23 to 14 cigarettes per day (p<.01) and maintained their reduction over the 6-month follow-up period. At the 6-month follow-up, 35% of usual-care and 41% of reduction participants (nonsignificant [ns]) moved forward in their stage of change. Over the 6 months, 34% of usual-care participants had at least one 24-h quit attempt, compared with 25% of reduction participants (ns). A total of 9% of usual-care participants remained quit at 6 months vs. 13% in the reduction group (ns). These preliminary results suggest that adding a reduction option neither increases nor undermines interest in cessation. Higher than expected rates of attempted cessation and quitting in the usual-care group suggest that we recruited smokers whose motivation to quit was above average. Thus, a replication test in a less-motivated group of smokers is needed.

PMID:
12745487
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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