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N Z Med J. 2003 May 2;116(1173):U420.

Is the PRIME (Primary Response In Medical Emergencies) scheme acceptable to rural general practitioners in New Zealand?

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1
Christchurch School of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Otago.

Abstract

AIM:

To ascertain the level of acceptance of the PRIME (Primary Response In Medical Emergencies) scheme by rural general practitioners (GPs) in New Zealand.

METHODS:

A nationwide, anonymous, postal/email questionnaire was sent to 536 rural/semi-rural GPs, inquiring as to their involvement in and opinions of emergency care, and the acceptability of the PRIME scheme.

RESULTS:

The overall response rate was 42%. PRIME training courses and PRIME equipment were regarded as excellent. However, concerns were raised by both PRIME and non-PRIME groups regarding the quality of triaging information given during emergencies and levels of remuneration for call-outs (especially medical call-outs). Additional concerns included lack of flexibility with the PRIME contract in some areas. Some GPs were also concerned that their involvement was less about providing a higher skill level in resuscitation than about filling the gaps in the already-stretched rural ambulance services, which was not the intention of the PRIME scheme.

CONCLUSIONS:

The inclusion of rural GPs in emergency care teams needs to be recognised and adequately remunerated, and these issues should be reflected in the ongoing development of pre-hospital emergency service contracts.

PMID:
12741408
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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