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Genes Dev. 2003 May 15;17(10):1225-39. Epub 2003 May 2.

A complex of LIN-5 and GPR proteins regulates G protein signaling and spindle function in C elegans.

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1
Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA.

Abstract

The Caenorhabditis elegans coiled-coil protein LIN-5 mediates several processes in cell division that depend on spindle forces, including alignment and segregation of chromosomes and positioning of the spindle. Here, we describe two closely related proteins, GPR-1 and GPR-2 (G protein regulator), which associate with LIN-5 in vivo and in vitro and depend on LIN-5 for localization to the spindle and cell cortex. GPR-1/GPR-2 contain a GoLoco/GPR motif that mediates interaction with GDP-bound Galpha(i/o). Inactivation of lin-5, gpr-1/gpr-2, or the Galpha(i/o) genes goa-1 and gpa-16 all cause highly similar chromosome segregation and spindle positioning defects, indicating a positive role for the LIN-5 and GPR proteins in G protein signaling. The lin-5 and gpr-1/gpr-2 genes appear to act downstream of the par polarity genes in the one- and two-cell stages and downstream of the tyrosine kinase-related genes mes-1 and src-1 at the four-cell stage. Together, these results indicate that GPR-1/GPR-2 in association with LIN-5 activate G protein signaling to affect spindle force. Polarity determinants may regulate LIN-5/GPR/Galpha locally to create the asymmetric forces that drive spindle movement. Results in C. elegans and other species are consistent with a novel model for receptor-independent activation of Galpha(i/o) signaling.

PMID:
12730122
PMCID:
PMC196055
DOI:
10.1101/gad.1081203
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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