Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Ann Bot. 2003 May;91(6):673-95.

Efficiency of lignin biosynthesis: a quantitative analysis.

Author information

  • 1SC-74/Germantown Building, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue SW, Washington DC 20585-1290, USA. jeff.amthor@science.doe.gov

Abstract

Lignin is derived mainly from three alcohol monomers: p-coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol. Biochemical reactions probably responsible for synthesizing these three monomers from sucrose, and then polymerizing the monomers into lignin, were analysed to estimate the amount of sucrose required to produce a unit of lignin. Included in the calculations were amounts of respiration required to provide NADPH (from NADP(+)) and ATP (from ADP) for lignin biosynthesis. Two pathways in the middle stage of monomer biosynthesis were considered: one via tyrosine (found in monocots) and the other via phenylalanine (found in all plants). If lignin biosynthesis proceeds with high efficiency via tyrosine, 76.9, 70.4 and 64.3 % of the carbon in sucrose can be retained in the fraction of lignin derived from p-coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol, respectively. The corresponding carbon retention values for lignin biosynthesis via phenylalanine are less, at 73.2, 65.7 and 60.7 %, respectively. Energy (i.e. heat of combustion) retention during lignin biosynthesis via tyrosine could be as high as 81.6, 74.5 and 67.8 % for lignin derived from p-coumaryl alcohol, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol, respectively, with the corresponding potential energy retention values for lignin biosynthesis via phenylalanine being less, at 77.7, 69.5 and 63.9 %, respectively. Whether maximum efficiency occurs in situ is unclear, but these values are targets that can be considered in: (1) plant breeding programmes aimed at maximizing carbon or energy retention from photosynthate; (2) analyses of (minimum) metabolic costs of responding to environmental change or pest attack involving increased lignin biosynthesis; (3) understanding costs of lignification in older tissues; and (4) interpreting carbon balance measurements of organs and plants with large lignin concentrations.

PMID:
12714366
PMCID:
PMC4242356
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center