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Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2003 Apr;128(4):550-9.

Endolymphatic sac-vein decompression for intractable Meniere's disease: long term treatment results.

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1
Michigan Ear Institute, Farmington Hills 48334, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to determine the long-term efficacy of endolymphatic sac-vein decompression surgery on patients with classic Meniere's disease.

STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING:

Using the 1995 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Committee on Hearing and Equilibrium criteria, starting stage, functional level, vertigo class, and hearing results were addressed. We studied 68 patients with classic Meniere's disease from a tertiary, private otology-neurotology practice. Patient data were gathered by retrospective chart review, questionnaire, and patient interview. All patients underwent endolymphatic sac-vein decompression with an average follow-up period of 55 months.

RESULTS:

Median functional level before surgery was level 4, improving to level 2 after surgery. Eighty-one percent of patients showed improvement in functional level, 12% remained stable, and 7% declined. Long-term vertigo control was 47% in class A, 25% in class B, 9% in class C, 3% in class D, and 16% in class F. Twenty percent of patients were in hearing stage I Meniere's disease; 31%, stage II; 44%, stage III; and 5%, stage IV. Eighteen percent of patients showed improvement in hearing class, 64% were stable, and 18% declined.

CONCLUSION:

Endolymphatic sac-vein decompression surgery is a safe, nondestructive surgical option for Meniere's disease that offers durable control of vertigo and stabilization of hearing for the majority of symptomatic patients.

SIGNIFICANCE:

The beneficial long-term outcome of the endolymphatic sac-vein decompression supports its continued use as a first-line treatment option in intractable Meniere's disease.

PMID:
12707660
DOI:
10.1016/S0194-59980300084-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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