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Oncol Nurs Forum. 2003 Mar-Apr;30(2):E40-7.

Delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea in women treated for breast cancer.

Author information

1
Institute for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA. sdibble@itsa.ucsf.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:

To describe the experience and intensity of delayed nausea in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer since the advent of the 5-HT3 antagonists.

DESIGN:

Multisite, longitudinal, descriptive.

SETTING:

7 outpatient oncology clinics situated in hospitals, 5 outpatient oncology clinics associated with major teaching universities, 27 private outpatient oncology practices, and 1 outpatient clinic located in a county hospital.

SAMPLE:

Typical participants (N = 303) were 51.9 years old, Caucasian (79%), married or partnered (65%), born U.S. citizens (92%), heterosexual (96%), living with someone (83%), and high school graduates (82%).

METHODS:

Baseline and poststudy questionnaires plus a daily diary of nausea through two cycles of chemotherapy (approximately two months) were used to collect data. The Rhodes Inventory of Nausea, Vomiting, and Retching was used to assess the nausea experience.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:

Nausea.

FINDINGS:

The worst nausea occurred on the third day after having chemotherapy for breast cancer. The types of oral antiemetics ordered for home use were changed between the two cycles of the study only 8% (n = 24) of the time. Younger, heavier women experienced more delayed nausea. Women who had a history of nausea with stress and women receiving cyclophosphamide experienced more delayed nausea during both time periods.

CONCLUSIONS:

Delayed nausea is a significant problem for women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer. IMPLICATION FOR NURSING: Oncology nurses can use the results from this study to provide anticipatory guidance for patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer.

PMID:
12692669
DOI:
10.1188/03.ONF.E40-E47
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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