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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2003 Apr;84(4):528-34.

Wheelchair configuration and postural alignment in persons with spinal cord injury.

Author information

1
Spinal Cord Injury Service, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA, USA. jhastings@ups.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether postural alignment and shoulder flexion range differ for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) seated in wheelchairs with standard configurations versus wheelchairs with posterior seat inclination and a low backrest set perpendicular to the floor.

DESIGN:

Prospective repeated-measures study.

SETTING:

Outpatient SCI clinic.

PARTICIPANTS:

Fourteen subjects with C6-T10 motor-complete SCI.

INTERVENTIONS:

Subjects sat in 3 manual wheelchairs: standard setup E&J Premier (S1), standard setup Quickie Breezy (S2), and test configuration Quickie TNT (T) with posterior seat inclination and a low backrest set perpendicular to the floor.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Shoulder and neck alignment and pelvic tilt were determined from sagittal plane digital photographs at rest and with maximal vertical reach.

RESULTS:

At rest, T produced less shoulder protraction than either standard configuration (difference between the mean values, S1: 1.6 cm, P=.048; S2: 1.2 cm, P=.013). S1 and S2 showed a greater head-forward position than T (differences between the mean values, S1: 6.5 degrees, P=.008; S2: 6.3 degrees, P=.013). T allowed greater humeral flexion than S2 (difference between the mean values: 3.7 degrees, P=.036) and greater vertical reach above the seat plane than either conventional configuration (differences between the mean values, S1: 4.7 cm, P=.005; S2: 4.1cm, P=.002). The indirect pelvic tilt measurement showed a trend (P=.06) toward greater posterior pelvic tilt with S1 and S2.

CONCLUSION:

The alternate configuration produces more vertical postural alignment and greater reach ability versus the standard factory setup wheelchairs.

PMID:
12690591
DOI:
10.1053/apmr.2003.50036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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