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J Perinatol. 2003 Mar;23(2):94-7.

Use of oxygen cannulas in extremely low birthweight infants is associated with mucosal trauma and bleeding, and possibly with coagulase-negative staphylococcal sepsis.

Author information

1
Department of Peditrics-Neonatology, Brody School of Medicine at east Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4354, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We studied the association between the use of oxygen cannulas (OCs) and (1) nasal bleeding and (2) coagulase-negative staphylococcal sepsis (CNSS).

STUDY DESIGN:

Review of care sheets, with chi(2) or sign-test group comparisons.

RESULTS:

Infants treated with OCs were suctioned more frequently (2.6 vs 1.3 times per day, p<0.001), and had more bloody nasal secretions (34.6% vs 4.6%, p<0.05) that increased with increasing OC days. By 10 days, 90% of infants had experienced bloody secretions.CNSS occurred less often in infants treated with oxyhoods than those on OC or CPAP (1 of 13, 8%, vs 10 of 44, 23%), but the difference was not significant. Eight of the 10 CNSS episodes clustered within 3 and 7 days of starting CPAP or cannula treatments.

CONCLUSION:

OC use in extremely low birthweight infants is associated with nasal mucosal injury and bleeding. Studies are needed to see if use of OCs is a risk factor for CNSS.

PMID:
12673256
DOI:
10.1038/sj.jp.7210865
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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