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Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Mar;21(3):297-8.

Isolated fetal ascites caused by Wolman disease.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics Gynecology, Rabin Medical Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tiqva, Israel. yudavi@inter.net.il

Abstract

Wolman disease is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder caused by reduced levels of lysosomal acid lipase. It occurs in infancy and is fatal in most cases before the age of 1 year. Affected infants show signs of lipid storage in most tissues, including hepatosplenomegaly, abdominal distension, vomiting, steatorrhea, failure to thrive, and adrenal calcifications. We present a case of isolated fetal ascites diagnosed at 32 weeks of gestation, with negative work-up for immune and non-immune hydrops fetalis and congenital infections and malformations. After delivery, the diagnosis of Wolman disease was established. Although rare, storage diseases such as Wolman disease should be considered in cases of isolated fetal ascites.

PMID:
12666227
DOI:
10.1002/uog.73
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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