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Psychol Addict Behav. 2003 Mar;17(1):73-82.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy plus contingency management for cocaine use: findings during treatment and across 12-month follow-up.

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1
Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program Treatment Section, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA. depstein@intra.nida.nih.gov

Abstract

Contingency management (CM) rapidly reduces cocaine use, but its effects subside after treatment. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) produces reductions months after treatment. Combined, the 2 might be complementary. One hundred ninety-three cocaine-using methadone-maintained outpatients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of group therapy (CBT or a control condition) and voucher availability (CM contingent on cocaine-negative urine or noncontingent). Follow-ups occurred 3, 6, and 12 months posttreatment. Primary outcome was cocaine-negative urine (urinalysis 3 times/week during treatment and once at each follow-up). During treatment, initial effects of CM were dampened by CBT. Posttreatment, there were signs of additive benefits, significant in 3- versus 12-month contrasts. Former CBT participants were also more likely to acknowledge cocaine use and its effects and to report employment.

PMID:
12665084
PMCID:
PMC1224747
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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