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Am J Ophthalmol. 2003 Apr;135(4):447-51.

Azithromycin vs doxycycline in the treatment of inclusion conjunctivitis.

Author information

1
Department of Ophthalmology, University Clinical Hospital, University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and safety of azithromycin and doxycycline in the treatment of chlamydial conjunctivitis in adults.

DESIGN:

An open, randomized clinical trial.

METHODS:

Seventy-eight adult patients with incluson conjunctivitis were enrolled in this multicenter clinical study. Patients with chlamydial conjunctivitis as indicated by a positive direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test or cell culture were randomized to receive a single 1-g dose of azithromycin or doxycycline, 100 mg twice daily for 10 days. A conjuctival swab for cell culture was obtained from all patients immediately before the treatment for subsequent confirmation of the presence of chlamydial infection in the central laboratory. Control examinations were performed 10 to 12 days and 4 to 6 weeks after the treatment initiation. Clinical and bacteriological responses to the treatment were evaluated at the last visit. The occurrence and frequency of adverse events were analyzed as well.

RESULTS:

Of 78 patients enrolled, 51 completed the study and were evaluated for efficacy. The main reasons for withdrawal were lack of confirmation of the presence of chlamydial infection by the central laboratory and failure to attend the follow-up visit. Eradication of C. trachomatis was achieved in 23 of 25 (92%) patients treated with azithromycin and in 25 of 26 (96%) patients treated with doxycycline. Clinical cure was observed in 15 (60%) and 18 (69%) patients treated with azithromycin and doxycycline, respectively. Both drugs were equally well tolerated.

CONCLUSIONS:

A single 1-g azithromycin therapy was as effective as standard 10-day treatment with doxycycline (100 mg twice daily) in the treatment of adult inclusion conjunctivitis.

PMID:
12654359
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9394(02)02094-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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