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Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2003 Jul;285(1):E25-30. Epub 2003 Mar 11.

Glucose-induced suppression of endogenous glucose production: dynamic response to differing glucose profiles.

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1
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Nutrition, Mayo Clinic Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA.

Abstract

To determine whether, in the presence of constant insulin concentrations, a change in glucose concentrations results in a reciprocal change in endogenous glucose production (EGP), glucagon ( approximately 130 ng/l) and insulin ( approximately 65 pmol/l) were maintained at constant "basal" concentrations while glucose was clamped at approximately 5.3 mM (euglycemia), approximately 7.0 mM (sustained hyperglycemia; n = 10), or varied to create a "postprandial" profile (profile; n = 11). EGP fell slowly over the 6 h of the euglycemia study. In contrast, an increase in glucose to 7.13 +/- 0.3 mmol/l resulted in prompt and sustained suppression of EGP to 9.65 +/- 1.21 micromol x kg-1 x min-1. On the profile study day, glucose increased to a peak of 11.2 +/- 0.5 mmol/l, and EGP decreased to a nadir of 6.79 +/- 2.54 micromol x kg-1 x min-1 by 60 min. Thereafter, the fall in glucose was accompanied by a reciprocal rise in EGP to rates that did not differ from those observed on the euglycemic study day (11.31 +/- 2.45 vs. 12.11 +/- 3.21 micromol x kg-1 x min-1). Although the pattern of change of glucose differed markedly on the sustained hyperglycemia and profile study days, by design the area above basal did not. This resulted in equivalent suppression of EGP below basal (-1,952 +/- 204 vs. -1,922 +/- 246 mmol. kg-1. 6 h-1). These data demonstrate that, in the presence of a constant basal insulin concentration, changes in glucose within the physiological range rapidly and reciprocally regulate EGP.

PMID:
12637258
DOI:
10.1152/ajpendo.00530.2002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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