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J Oral Rehabil. 2003 Apr;30(4):386-91.

Comorbidity of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint and silent dysfunction of the cervical spine.

Author information

1
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Medical University of Hanover, Germany. ms@prothetik.zmk.mh-hannover.de

Abstract

The aim of this evaluation was to examine correlations between internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cervical spine disorder (CSD). A prospective controlled clinical study was carried out. Thirty patients with signs and symptoms of internal derangement but without any subjective neck problems and 30 age- and gender-matched control subjects without signs and symptoms of internal derangement were examined. The investigation of the temporomandibular system was carried out using a 'Craniomandibular Index'. Afterwards an examiner-blinded manual medical investigation of the craniocervical system was performed. This included muscle palpation of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle as well as passive movement tests of the cervical spine, to detect restrictions in the range of movement as well as segmental intervertebral dysfunction. The internal derangement of the TMJ was significantly associated with 'silent' CSD (t-test, P < 0.05). Patients with raised muscle tenderness of the temporomandibular system exhibited significantly more often pain on pressure of the neck muscles than patients without muscle tenderness of the temporomandibular system (t-test, P < 0.05). As a result of the present study, for patients with internal derangement of the TMJ an additional examination of the craniocervical system should be recommended.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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