Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Neurosci. 2003 Feb;17(4):879-86.

Repeated restraint stress suppresses neurogenesis and induces biphasic PSA-NCAM expression in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA. karapham@stanford.edu

Abstract

Chronic restraint stress has been shown to induce structural remodelling throughout the interconnected dentate gyrus-CA3 fields. To find out how this stressor affects the rate of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, we subjected rats to acute or chronic restraint stress and assessed the proliferation, survival and differentiation of newly born cells in the dentate gyrus. We also examined polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule expression, a molecule normally expressed in immature neurons and important for morphological plasticity. The results show that acute restraint stress did not change either the proliferation of dentate gyrus precursor cells or the expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule, whereas 3 weeks of chronic restraint stress suppressed proliferation by 24% and increased polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule expression by 40%. The study was extended for an additional 3 weeks to trace the survival and development of the cells born after the initial 3 weeks of restraint. Rats subjected to 6 weeks of daily restraint stress exhibited suppressed cell proliferation and attenuated survival of the recently born cells after the extended time course, resulting in a 47% reduction of granule cell neurogenesis. Furthermore, 6 weeks of chronic stress significantly reduced the total number of granule cells by 13% and the granule cell layer volume by 5%. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule followed a biphasic time course, displaying a significant up-regulation after 3 weeks of daily restraint stress that was lost after 6 weeks of stress. These studies may help us understand the basis for hippocampal shrinkage and raise questions about the ultimate reversibility of the effects of chronic stress.

PMID:
12603278
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center