Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Mar;77(3):663-7.

Thyroid size and goiter prevalence after introduction of iodized salt: a 5-y prospective study in schoolchildren in Côte d'Ivoire.

Author information

1
Human Nutrition Laboratory, Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zürich, Switzerland. michael.zimmermann@ilw.agrl.ethz.ch

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The long-term goal of salt iodization is elimination of iodine deficiency and reduction of the goiter rate to < 5% in school-aged children. Normalization of the goiter rate probably indicates disappearance of iodine deficiency disorders as a public health problem. However, thyroid size may not return to normal for months or years after correction of iodine deficiency.

OBJECTIVE:

We described the time course and pattern of changes in thyroid size and goiter rate in response to the introduction of iodized salt in an area of severe endemic goiter.

DESIGN:

In a 5-y prospective study, we measured thyroid size by ultrasonography and urinary iodine and thyroid hormone concentrations in schoolchildren 6 mo before the introduction of iodized salt and annually for 4 y thereafter.

RESULTS:

Four years after the introduction of iodized salt and normalization of the median urinary iodine concentration, mean thyroid size had decreased 56% (P < 0.0001). However, 29% of the children remained goitrous, with a significant age shift in the distribution of goiter. At baseline, the goiter rate was significantly higher in younger (age: 5-9 y) than in older (age: 10-14 y) children (P < 0.0001). At 2, 3, and 4 y after salt iodization, the goiter rate was significantly higher in the older than in the younger children (at 4 y: 52% compared with 19%), and the difference increased with time (P < 0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

The goiter rate in school-aged children may remain sharply elevated for up to 4 y after successful introduction of iodized salt, primarily because of persistent goiter in older children.

PMID:
12600858
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center