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Clin Infect Dis. 2003 Mar 1;36(5):663-8. Epub 2003 Feb 7.

Bacterial vaginosis is a strong predictor of Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Magee-Womens Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. hwiesenfeld@mail.magee.edu

Abstract

To evaluate whether bacterial vaginosis predicts the acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), we studied 255 nonpregnant female subjects aged 15-30 who reported recent sexual contact with a male partner in whom either gonococcal or chlamydial urethritis or nongonococcal urethritis was diagnosed. Compared to subjects with normal vaginal flora, subjects with bacterial vaginosis were more likely to test positive for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-9.7) and Chlamydia trachomatis (OR, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.5-7.8). Subjects colonized vaginally by hydrogen peroxide-producing lactobacilli were less likely to receive a diagnosis of chlamydial infection or gonorrhea than subjects without such lactobacilli. Bacterial vaginosis was a strong predictor of gonorrhea and chlamydial infection among subjects who reported recent exposure to a male partner with urethritis. These data support the importance of vaginal flora in the defense against STD acquisition.

PMID:
12594649
DOI:
10.1086/367658
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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