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Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2003 Feb;76(1):55-62. Epub 2002 Oct 2.

Urine mutagenicity of farmers occupationally exposed during a 1-day use of chlorothalonil and insecticides.

Author information

1
GRECAN (Université de Caen-Basse-Normandie), Laboratoire de Cancérologie Expérimentale, Centre François Baclesse, route de Lion sur Mer, 14076 Caen cedex 5, France. v.andre@baclesse.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

A study was conducted to evaluate the genotoxic impregnation consecutive to a 1-day open-field spraying of pesticides.

METHODS:

From 14 farmers (five smokers and nine non-smokers), three urine samples were collected at the end of the spraying season: the morning (S1) of the day of spraying, the evening (S2) and the morning (S3) of the following day. A fourth sample (S0) was obtained before the pesticide-handling period. Mutagenicity of urine extracts was evaluated with the Ames test, using strains TA97a, TA98, TA100 and TA102, with and without S9 mix.

RESULTS:

The ratio of induced vs spontaneous revertants (induction ratio) was > or =2 in five farmers (including three smokers), with only one strain responding in each. Applying the SALM software proposed by Kim and Margolin in combination with the ANOVA-Dunnett test on crude data (number of revertants), urine extracts were found to be mutagenic on at least one Salmonella strain in 57% and 96% of non-smokers and smokers, respectively. The proportion of mutagenic responses tended to increase from S1 to S3 (not statistically significant) in non-smokers only. Finally, there were no relationships between the relative changes in the number of revertants (adjusted for urine concentration) and any exposure parameters available: area sprayed, number of tanks prepared and time free of exposure to any pesticide.

CONCLUSIONS:

The lack of significant relationships between urine mutagenicity and exposure data argues against a direct role of the pesticides sprayed, on this impregnation. This result should be considered with caution since the number of farmers involved may limit the significance of the study.

PMID:
12592583
DOI:
10.1007/s00420-002-0382-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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