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Respiration. 2003 Jan-Feb;70(1):60-6.

Bronchial hyperreactivity and allergic status in inflammatory bowel disease.

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1
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Marmara University School of Medicine, Istanbul, Turkey. bbcey@superonline.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the known systemic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a large number of reports associating lung disease and IBD, the frequency of atopy and bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) in IBD remains obscure.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of abnormal pulmonary function tests, BHR and the atopic status in patients with IBD.

METHODS:

Thirty patients with IBD (19 with ulcerative colitis and 11 with Crohn's disease; 19 male, 11 female) and 16 controls without any gastrointestinal disease (9 female, 7 male) were included. Patients were questioned with respect to pulmonary and allergic symptoms; subsequently, lung function tests, BHR, skin prick test positivity, peripheral eosinophilia and serum IgE levels were evaluated and compared with those of control subjects.

RESULTS:

The mean duration of IBD was 5.3 +/- 4.8 years. IBD patients had significantly more often respiratory symptoms in comparison with controls (odds ratio, OR: 9.0, p < 0.04). A previous diagnosis of asthma and antiasthmatic drug treatment were noted in 3/30 (10%) IBD patients. Allergic symptoms were more prevalent in IBD patients in comparison with the controls (OR: 13, p < 0.007), particularly in patients with ulcerative colitis (OR: 16, p < 0.004). The mean FEV(1 )was 3.1 +/- 0.9 liters (96 +/- 18% predicted), mean methacholine PD(20): 14.7 +/- 3.6 mg/ml, mean IgE: 190.5 +/- 305.6 IU/ml (normal value <94 IU/ml) and the percentage of peripheral eosinophils was 3.1 +/- 3.3% in the IBD patients. These values did not result in statistically significant differences in comparison with controls. Furthermore, abnormal lung function and BHR were observed in 8/30 (27%) and 5/30 (17%) IBD patients, respectively. Abnormal lung function tests were more prevalent in the IBD patients than in the controls (OR: 12, p < 0.04). Skin prick tests were positive in 15/30 (50%) IBD patients. The risk of a positive skin prick test increased in the IBD patients in comparison with the controls (OR: 7.0, p < 0.02). Duration and activity of IBD did not influence the prevalence of BHR, allergic and respiratory symptoms, abnormal lung function, high serum IgE levels and skin test positivity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Allergic symptoms, respiratory symptoms, abnormal lung function tests and skin prick test positivity were more common among the IBD patients in comparison with the controls.

PMID:
12584393
DOI:
68407
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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