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J Am Acad Dermatol. 2003 Feb;48(2):189-93.

Tinea capitis in Cleveland: survey of elementary school students.

Author information

1
Center for Medical Mycology and Mycology Reference Laboratory, Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals of Cleveland and Case Western Reserve University, 11100 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106-5028, USA. MAG3@PO.CWRU.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Tinea capitis, a fungal infection of the scalp, is of increasing public health importance, and Trichophyton tonsurans has become the primary causative agent in North America.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the prevalence of dermatophyte-positive scalp cultures among elementary schoolchildren in Cleveland, Ohio, describe predisposing factors, and measure the antifungal susceptibility of isolates collected.

OBSERVATIONS:

A total of 937 children from 8 Cleveland elementary schools were cultured for the presence of dermatophytes; 122 children (13%), all of whom were African American, had dermatophyte-positive cultures of the scalp. Sixty percent of cases were asymptomatic, indicating a carrier state. Race, scaling, and the use of anti-dandruff shampoo were associated with increased likelihood of infection. T tonsurans was the only organism isolated (except 1 Microsporum canis isolate). All isolates were susceptible to fluconazole, griseofulvin, itraconazole, and terbinafine.

CONCLUSIONS:

T tonsurans was the predominant dermatophyte isolated. Further multicenter studies are needed to confirm the predominance of dermatophyte-positive scalp cultures among African American children and to determine modifiable and preventable risk factors.

PMID:
12582387
DOI:
10.1067/mjd.2003.109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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