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J Lab Clin Med. 2003 Feb;141(2):110-20.

Calcium-binding proteins MRP 8 and 14 in a Staphylococcus aureus infection model: role of therapy, inflammation, and infection persistence.

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1
Section of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA. herndonb@umkc.edu

Abstract

Concentrations of the calcium-binding proteins of the S100 family, myeloid-related proteins 8 and MRP 14 (MRP8/14), are elevated in chronic infections, yet the role of these proteins is not clearly defined. Using commercial and developed enzyme immunoassays, we assayed for MRP8/14 in sterile-filtered abscess fluid from tissue-cage-implanted rats and rabbits. Staphylococcus aureus abscesses were created 6 weeks after the intraperitoneal implantation of tissue cages. Leukocytes, bacteria, and non-protein-bound calcium and zinc were measured in the infection exudate at day 3 or 5 of infection and after 8 days of treatment with antimicrobials beta-lactams (18 rabbits, 35 rats) and fluoroquinolone-rifampin (6 rabbits). Half of the infected rats were depleted of neutrophils; these rats exhibited significantly lower MRP 8/14 concentrations on all days sampled, regardless of the level of infection. The level of abscess MRP 8/14 is high early in the course of infection but decreases with effective antimicrobial treatment by as much as 100-fold. Thirty-day-old abscesses with log 6 bacterial counts and low neutrophil counts showed low concentrations of MRP 8/14 in these models. In abscess fluid, interleukin-6, as a representative marker of inflammation, correlated with MRP8/14, whereas ionized calcium and zinc did not. Our data suggest that infection and inflammation are not equal stimuli for MRP 8/14. The neutrophil appears to be the main source of MRP8/14 in this model.

PMID:
12577047
DOI:
10.1067/mlc.2003.17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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