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Auton Autacoid Pharmacol. 2002 Apr;22(2):73-82.

Endothelium-dependent relaxation in isolated renal arteries of diabetic rabbits.

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1
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, PO Box 24923, Safat 13110, Kuwait.

Abstract

1 In this study, we have investigated the vasodilator response to acetylcholine under diabetes conditions in isolated renal arteries of rabbits. We have also examined the contribution of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) to the endothelium-dependent relaxation caused by acetylcholine in the renal arteries of alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits. 2 Acetylcholine (10(-10) - 10(-4) M) produced cumulative concentration-response curve in the renal arteries of both control and diabetic rabbits. The EC50 values and maximal responses to acetylcholine were not significantly different relative to diabetic conditions. In order to isolate the EDHF component of acetylcholine-induced vasodilator response, L-nitro-methyl arginine ester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M) and indomethacin (10(-6) M) were added to the Krebs' solution throughout the experiment. Under these conditions, acetylcholine induced vasodilatation in the isolated renal arteries from both control and diabetic rabbits. The vasodilator response to acetylcholine was not affected under diabetic conditions. 3 Sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced relaxation was increased in the diabetic rabbits compared with the control animals. 4 Tetrabutyl ammonium (TBA, 0.5 mM) produced a significant reduction in acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation in both preparations from control and diabetic animals, consistent with involvement of K+ channels in mediating this response. Glibenclamide (1 microM) attenuated acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation in preparations from control animals only, while iberiotoxin (0.05 microM) significantly reduced the vasodilator response to acetylcholine in preparations from both control and diabetic animals. 5 The role of EDNO in mediating acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation was examined. The vascular preparations were incubated with 20 mM K(+)-Krebs' solution to inhibit the EDHF contribution to acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation. Under this condition, acetylcholine induced a vasodilator response in both preparations from control and diabetic rats. Pretreatment with L-NAME (10(-4) M) attenuated acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation in both preparations, indicating an nitric oxide-mediated vasodilator response. 6 Our results indicated that acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation in the isolated renal arteries of alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits was not affected under diabetic conditions. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation is mediated by two vasodilator components; namely, EDHF and EDNO. The contribution of EDHF and EDNO to acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation was not affected under diabetic conditions and there was no indication of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes. EDHF component was found to act mainly through high conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels under normal and diabetic conditions, while the adenosine triphosphate-dependent K+ channels were involved in mediating acetylcholine vasodilator response in the control preparations only.

PMID:
12568124
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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