Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Am J Ment Retard. 2003 Mar;108(2):71-81.

Phenomenology of self-restraint.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. C.Oliver@Bham.ac.uk

Abstract

Self-restraint is often reported in individuals with mental retardation who show self-injurious behavior (SIB). In this study, the phenomenology and prevalence of self-restraint in individuals showing self-injury and wearing protective devices and those showing self-injury but not wearing protective devices were compared. A high prevalence of self-restraint in the whole sample of individuals showing self-injury was identified (67/88, 76.1%), and self-restraint was more prevalent in a group showing self-injury but not wearing protective devices (43/47, 91.5%) than in a group showing self-injury and wearing protective devices (24/41, 58.5%). Individuals not wearing protective devices showed a greater number of topographies of self-restraint than those who did wear them. Results are discussed with reference to the purely topographical definition of self-restraint employed and the potential equivalence of protective devices and self-restraint.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Allen Press, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Support Center