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J Gastrointest Surg. 2003 Jan;7(1):53-58. doi: 10.1016/S1091-255X(02)00136-1.

The effect of chronic pain syndromes and psychoemotional disorders on symptomatic and quality-of-life outcomes of antireflux surgery.

Author information

1
Division of General Surgery, K-8, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 West Grand Blvd., 48202-2689, Detroit, MI. vvelano1@hfhs.org.

Abstract

Psychoemotional disorders (PED) and chronic pain syndromes (CPS) are common problems. Many patients with these disorders also suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is unclear how PED/CPS affect outcomes of antireflux surgery; therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if PED/CPS adversely affects the results of surgical therapy for GERD. All patients referred for surgical therapy for GERD completed both the GERD-HRQL symptom severity instrument and the SF-36 generic quality-of-life instrument prior to surgery. To be candidates for surgery, patients must have symptomatic GERD and objective evidence of pathologic reflux by upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH monitoring. Patients underwent either laparoscopic or open Nissen or Toupet fundoplication. Six to 24 months postoperatively, patients were evaluated for satisfaction and quality-of-life. Ninety-three percent of control patients compared to 25% of PED/CPS patients were satisfied with surgery (P < 0.001). Dissatisfaction in PED/CPS patients was generally due to persistent or new somatic complaints. Median total GERD-HRQL scores improved for both groups, although postoperative scores were worse in the PED/CPS group. PED/CPS patients had significantly worse SF-36 scores both preoperatively and postoperatively compared to control patients. SF-36 scores improved in four of eight domains in control patients and none in the PED/CPS patients. In conclusion, PED/CPS patients are generally dissatisfied with antireflux surgery. Although some patients do benefit from surgery, careful patient selection is required.

PMID:
12559185
DOI:
10.1016/S1091-255X(02)00136-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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