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J Nutr Educ Behav. 2002 Nov-Dec;34(6):310-5.

Do food-related experiences in the first 2 years of life predict dietary variety in school-aged children?

Author information

1
Nutrition Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville 37996-1920, USA. skinner@utk.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if food-related experiences in the first 2 years of life predict dietary variety in school-aged children.

DESIGN/SETTING:

Child/mother pairs were interviewed 7 or 8 times when children were 2 to 24 months using a randomized incomplete block design to schedule interviews. Each child/mother pair was interviewed when the child was ages 6, 7, and 8 years.

PARTICIPANTS:

Child/mother pairs (n = 70) were continuous participants in the longitudinal study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Dependent variables were children's vegetable and fruit dietary variety, assessed from 3 days of dietary data at ages 6, 7, and 8 years. Independent variables from the first 2 years of life were selected from the longitudinal data set.

ANALYSES:

General linear models. Adjustments for age that vegetables (or fruits) were introduced in the diet.

RESULTS:

Vegetable variety in the school-aged child was predicted by mother's vegetable preferences, R2 =.084. Fruit variety in the school-aged child was predicted by breast-feeding duration and either early fruit variety (R2 =.254) or fruit exposure (R2 =.246).

CONCLUSIONS/IMPLICATIONS:

Nutrition education messages for mothers should emphasize the importance of early food-related experiences to school-aged children's acceptance of a variety of vegetables and fruits.

PMID:
12556269
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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